The U.S. presidential elections and its impact on NATO

%e1%83%9b%e1%83%9d%e1%83%9a%e1%83%9d%e1%83%93%e1%83%98%e1%83%9c%e1%83%94%e1%83%91%e1%83%98-%e1%83%95%e1%83%90%e1%83%a0%e1%83%a8%e1%83%90%e1%83%95%e1%83%98%e1%83%a1-%e1%83%a1%e1%83%90%e1%83%9b%e1%83%98The country’s foreign policy equally depends on the internal political, economic and social processes, as well as, on the international environment, whether on a regional or global level. For every democratic society, elections are essential allowing citizens to assess the domestic and foreign policy of the past years and decide whether to support previous political force or choose a new path. More

ROAD TO NATO – LATVIA

4Latvia, similar to Lithuania and Estonia, gained the independence in 1991. After 13 years, in 2004, it became a member of the EU and NATO. On its path to international recognition, Latvia overcame quite a big bunch of obstacles: the Ministry of Defense was formed; the draft of mandatory military service was created to establish new Latvian forces. One of the biggest challenges included Russian military troops refusing to leave the country. More

Road to NATO – Lithuania

3In September of 1991, following failed coup in Moscow the previous month, USSR recognized Lithuania’s independence. In 1993, Russia withdrew all the Soviet troops from the Baltic Region, starting with Lithuania.

The first years of independence turned out to be harsh. The country faced the same problems as the most post-Soviet countries did – the hardships of transition to free market, the flourishing bureaucracy and the organized crime. More

Road to NATO – Estonia

1Estonia gained independence in 1991, like Georgia. By the end of 2002, two significant events took place in a contemporary history of Estonia – the country received official invitations to join NATO and the European Union. In 2004, 13 years after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Estonia became a member of these organizations. In January 2011, it became a member of the Eurozone. More

The role of Euro-Atlantic Integration in shaping Georgian Foreign Policy and its influence to Armenia and Azerbaijan

CaucasusThe purpose of the policy brief is to describe the successful factors of the Euro-Atlantic integration policy in shaping Georgian foreign policy. The second part of the paper will examine the influence of Georgia’s integrated Foreign Policy on Armenia and Azerbaijan. I would like to examine what kind of influence can Georgia’s newly Westernized policy have on Armenia and Azerbaijan. Georgia has become a more pro-Western strategic state and has been striving for membership of Euro-Atlantic Alliance among other neighboring countries in the South Caucasus. The state’s pro-Western stance and desire to join EU and NATO is against Russian Empire and its foreign policies. The Georgian government is eager to join NATO, mentioning that they don’t have other alternative choices.

Georgia is a member of Eastern Partnership and a priority country of the European Neighborhood Policy. Still, EU continues to support Georgia’s efforts to become a member of the EU. And, at the same time the country is actively involved in the integration process to NATO and reveals its desire to become a member to the North Atlantic Alliance. Presently, Georgia has chosen the way of becoming a member of EU and NATO in order to enhance its capacities through Western values. More

Farewell Address Competition – Rima Beridze – Lord Ismay

Ismay

On April 5th, 2015 YATA-Georgia with the support of Embassy of Romania and the International Black Sea University held the final round of the “Farewell Address Competition”. 6 Participants, that were selected through the application process, presented their Farewell Addresses of those NATO Secretary Generals they have picked beforehand, in front of the audience and judges.
First three-place winners were selected by the judges and were given the special prizes provided by the Embassy of Romania.

Below you can find address of one of the participants:

Rima Beridze – Lord Ismay

Good afternoon Mr. and Ms.

It’s a huge honor for me to stand and speak in front of you one more time as a secretary-general of NATO.
Exactly Five years ago I was asked by Antony Eden to accept this position but my answer was an immediate and emphatic negative. You might ask why? Well, because I saw the NATO as an overly bureaucratic and inefficient organization. I had characterized NATO as “too much harness and too little horse.”

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Farewell Address Competition – Mamuka Kirkitadze – Anders Fogh Rassmussen

Mamuka Kir

On April 5th, 2015 YATA-Georgia with the support of Embassy of Romania and the International Black Sea University held the final round of the “Farewell Address Competition”. 6 Participants, that were selected through the application process, presented their Farewell Addresses of those NATO Secretary Generals they have picked beforehand, in front of the audience and judges.

First three-place winners were selected by the judges and were given the special prizes provided by the Embassy of Romania.

Below you can find addresses of the participants:

Mamuka Kirkitadze – Anders Fogh Rassmussen:

This is my last month in office as NATO Secretary General.  And I have to say these past five years have been the busiest and most challenging – for NATO and for me personally.  Serving for NATO, an organization that promotes more peaceful, secure and democratic world, has been a great honor for me. There have been many ups and downs, some great successes and disappointments, but overall, NATO has always stood for its primary goals.

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The Prospects for NATO and EU Military Cooperation

Historical Background

NATO and the EU share common strategic interests. In a spirit of complementarity, both organizations consult and work together to prevent and resolve crises and armed conflicts. The decision to cooperate on security issues goes back to 24 January 2001 when the NATO Secretary General and the EU Presidency exchanged letters defining the scope of cooperation and the modalities of consultation between the two organizations. Cooperation has accelerated ever since. More